Todt: “I watched the Brazilian GP with Michael Schumacher”

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Translated from German:

FIA President and former Michael Schumacher team boss Jean Todt has spoken from the minds of many fans with his criticism of the German Formula 1 TV broadcast by RTL. Tenor: too much advertising, racing events hardly comprehensible.

Todt prefers split-screen advertising

In an interview with AUTO BILD MOTORSPORT, the Frenchman now gives concrete form to his criticism and reveals that he followed the race on RTL while visiting his friend Michael Schumacher.

“I’m actually always cautious when I say something.

But it’s true that I watched the Brazil GP in Switzerland with Michael,” says Todt.

What the 72-year-old disliked: “I was very frustrated because I couldn’t believe my eyes after five minutes. When I watch a race, I always have an iPad lying next to me with all the times. That’s why advertising doesn’t bother me so much.

“I also understand that private broadcasters finance their coverage in this way and that the procedure complies with the law. But I would have wished for one of those little windows in the corner where I wouldn’t miss the race completely. When I see a race, I want to be able to understand it.”

The reporting itself by RTL does not want to pillory Todt. “The reporters and commentators are very competent. I didn’t want to criticize that. I know how difficult this job is. I wouldn’t want to do that and I always advised Michael against it,” Todt concluded.

According to German law, RTL is allowed to show twelve minutes of advertising per hour.

autobild.de

The FIA have changed the way that power unit penalties are applied in a Grand Prix weekend, in a bid to reduce the chances of drivers choosing not to qualify.

For 2019, the starting order for the drivers who have ‘back-of-the-grid’ penalties will be determined in qualifying, so whoever finishes ahead in the qualifying result.

jamesallenonf1.com

Vettel forces a child to swap Mercedes for his Ferrari cap

Hartley: “I’m in a pretty good place. I’ve definitely been better,”

“I’ve maintained a relationship with Porsche through all of this, I was with them for four years through the two world championships and Le Mans. My phone has been glued to my ear over the last week, a lot of emails.

“Not the perfect time of year to be sorting out a drive, coming into December but I’ve got a good reputation and just trying to figure out what the right steps are and also what’s going to keep me happy.

“You will definitely see me doing something next year but it won’t be Formula One.

“I would never say it’s closed. 10 years ago when that door was effectively shut, I’ve proven that it’s possible to open it again.

“I’m now in a position where I have a Super license, I have hands-on Formula One experience, I definitely didn’t disgrace myself and I definitely wouldn’t say that door is closed. 

“The politics I don’t enjoy. It took me some time to get used to the extra media attention. I was definitely prepared coming into Formula One being involved in Porsche and LMP2 but I think the pressure definitely ramped up more than I expected in terms of being under the microscope a lot more but I got more and more comfortable with that during the season.”

“There are so many fantastic experiences I take away from the season. Driving the fastest Formula One cars that the world has seen, maybe the fastest ever. There’s a lot to be proud but I did feel like I had more to give in Formula One.”

radiosport.co.nz